Missouri’s Water Quality 2021 – What’s the Top Water Problems in Major Cities of MO

Missourians enjoy water sourced from a variety of naturally occurring water supplies. Lakes, rivers, and underground sources all provide the cities across Missouri with potable water.

A plethora of sources does not mean the state has no challenges with its supply. Many residents get water from large rivers that travel long distances through industrial and agricultural regions.

These types of influences often lead to toxins, organisms, and other pollutants entering water supplies. Obviously, these issues must be treated at facilities specialized in removing them from the system.

Treatment can make water drinkable and safe but presents some of its own unpleasant symptoms. Other influences from these natural resources also create unavoidable challenges like hard water.

Common Water Problems by City

Each city sources and treats its water in a way that is unique and requires its own plan for making the water safe for its residents. Many challenges are similar but each area will have difficulties presented by its specific source.

City

Water Source

Common Problems

Typical Symptoms

Kansas City



Missouri River



Hard Water



Dry Skin


Limescale

St. Louis



Missouri River


Mississippi River

Hard Water



Dry Skin


Limescale

Springfield







Fulbright Spring


McDaniel Lake


Fellows Lake


James River

Hard Water







Dry Skin


Limescale





Kansas City

The Missouri River is a source for water and aquifer replenishment for many cities in Missouri. Kansas City is one of them and takes around 90 million gallons of water from the large river each day.

There are many potential polluters upstream on the Missouri River leading to the necessity for a strong treatment plan. This treatment makes the water safe to drink but can lead to a taste of chlorine in the water every now and then.

Kansas City residents often experience hard water. While water treatment facilities provide safe drinking water, it is rare that they soften the water enough to remove the presence of this condition for residents.

Hard water is typically harmless outside of causing dry skin after bathing. It can also impact appliances and plumbing over time if left untreated for long periods of time.

St. Louis

St. Louis, Missouri also pulls most of its 150 million gallons a day from the Missouri River. Some of its water comes from near the area of confluence of the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers.

Water experts in the area state that even the combined water is mostly from the Missouri River portion because of the way the water mixes as it travels downstream.

In either case, large rivers are obviously susceptible to a vast array of contaminants. Smaller rivers and large streams flow into these larger bodies, bringing with them organic and non-organic pollutants from the areas surrounding their banks.

St. Louis treats its water to make it safe to drink, despite all these contaminants. One area that can be difficult to deal with is the presence of dissolved minerals in the system, which presents as hard water.

Hard water can result in plumbing inefficiency, as well as dry skin after bathing in hard water.

Springfield

Water comes from many different sources in Springfield, Missouri. Multiple lakes and rivers keep supply lines flowing with water.

There are two major water treatment plants servicing the city and each gets its water from different sources. Fulbright Spring and McDaniel Lake supply one plant while Fellows Lake and the James River is used by the other treatment plant.

The most significant issue Springfield residents experience is hard water caused by mineral deposits dissolving as the water travels from its source to homes and businesses.

Hard water can be a mild inconvenience in some cases, requiring extra cleaning of sinks and faucets. Some residents experience physical symptoms after bathing like an itchy scalp and dry skin. Limescale also results from hard water, making appliances less efficient over time.